Tracking local governments expenditure on sanitation

Tracking local governments expenditure on sanitation Challenges and early findings Aguaconsult, in partnership with Maple Consult, is investigating local expenditure on sanitation and hygiene services in four districts in Ghana. The consultancy was commissioned by the Environmental Health and Sanitation Department (EHSD) with support from UNICEF Ghana. Goufrane Mansour (Aguaconsult, project manager), Robert Van Ess (Maple Consult, national WASH expert) and Didier Allély-Fermé (Aguaconsult associate, technical lead) reflect on some of the challenges involved and the emerging picture on public financing for sanitation.

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Where accountability for sustainable services lies.

I am back from the 11th IRC event which brought together 30 WASH professionals to share experiences related to monitoring the sustainability of WASH services. DGIS has championed sustainability by introducing the sustainability clause and the sustainability checks. RVO (Netherlands Enterprise Agency) has translated this policy by requiring all applicants to its new Fund for Sustainable Water to adopt it.

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New Perspectives on CBM 'plus': lessons from 17 Indian states

Members of the Aguaconsult team attended a session organised by Cranfield University and IRC,  held at the Australian High Commission in London, to present the preliminary results of their field research from India. The evening provided an opportunity to reflect on community-based management, and what the key ingredients of success might look like. In far too may cases “handing-over” the management of rural water supply to communities is a euphemism for “abandonment”, to use the words of Richard Carter, who chaired the evening.

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How can we monitor WASH services in an extremely resource constrained environment: the example of Madagascar.

The WASH sector in Madagascar is undergoing significant changes: the sustainable WASH strategy laying out priorities for the next decade has recently been approved and officially initiates discussions on the operationalisation of the Sector Wide Approach (SWAp); a new “code de l’eau” emphasising  decentralisation is being re-visited; a functional regulation authority might see the light of day, regional planning is being rolled out and an agreement has been signed between ministries for the creation of technical WASH positions at the communal level.

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Infant (pump) Mortality in South Sudan

A few months ago I was on a trip to South Sudan. Excited to be working in the newest country in the world, and after a week of meetings and a three day workshop I decided to take a stroll around the small dusty town where I was temporarily residing. About two hundred meters from the gate to the compound is a school, built by a programme funded by a large bilateral aid organization, which will remain nameless.

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Handpump Failure in South Sudan- Doing the Math

In some parts of South Sudan the going rate for drilling a borehole and fitting it with an India Mark II can range between $13,000 and $15,000. On a recent trip there I encountered a failed handpump with the date scribed into the wet concrete apron when it was being finished.  Being generous in the number of days the pumps was in use, the cost per day of the pump was somewhere between $41 and $52.

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Why do we keep doing what we do? – some reflections from Swaziland

Why do we keep doing what we do? – some reflections from Swaziland At the end of last month I went to Swaziland on the request of the government’s Department of Water Affairs (DWA) and WaterAid's office in southern Africa. It was an interesting trip and we managed to cover a lot of ground given that it is a pretty small country that was not so hard to do. My brief was to look at the underlying reasons for poor functionality – or lack of sustainability – of rural water facilities.

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When Access To Improved Water Points Does Not Lead to Use: Understanding Consumption Patterns in Burkina Faso

The correlation between access to drinking water, health, nutrition and other development indicators is well known. At sector level, this often translates into the requirement to allocate additional funding to new infrastructure (in the rural sector, mainly to water points), that would naturally lead to widespread use by households, attracted by convenience and quality of service. A recent household study from IRC in the Sahel Region, shows that even in villages where access rates exceed 100%, a large proportion of households either compliment their domestic water consumption at informal water points, or rely on them for all their needs.

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Monitoring project interventions may undermine efforts towards supporting and developing comprehensive and well-functioning national monitoring systems

Development partners of all shapes and sizes – from small charities to large international non-governmental organisations and bi-lateral donors – support interventions which aim to increase coverage and provide sustainable services. Although there is an increasing push for aligning national planning priorities (and even in some cases financing mechanisms), much of the funding today is still diverted towards stand-alone projects, which can often be de-linked from broader sector frameworks. Despite this problem, we also know that these types of externally financed projects can act as testing grounds for new and innovative approaches that are flexible and responsive to quick learning cycles.

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Que Faire Quand L'acces a L'eau Potable Ne Garantit Pas Son Usage Par Les Menages?

La corrélation directe entre l’accès à l’eau potable et le niveau de santé, de nutrition et autres indicateurs de développement est aujourd’hui largement reconnue.   Sur cette base, le secteur conclut souvent qu’il est nécessaire d’allouer davantage d’investissements aux infrastructures (en milieu rural, principalement pour la construction de forages équipés de pompes à motricité humaine -PMH) et que l’usage des ménages suivra, guidé par la commodité et la qualité de l’eau.   Comment expliquer que dans certains cas, l’existence de points d’eau formels ne garantit par leur usage par les ménages ? Au Burkina Faso, bien que le taux d’équipement d’accès (sources améliorées ou SA) en milieu rural soit estimé à près de 78% et dans certains villages dépasse 100% (ce qui signifie que certains villages sont suréquipés), de nombreux villageois continuent de s’approvisionner à des sources non améliorées, ou dites traditionnelles (SNA) telles que les puits ou les eaux de surface, considérées comme impropres à la consommation ; pour satisfaire leurs besoins de base.

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